back to top
My wish lists
Save your wish list
If you want to add more content to your wish list, simply log in. If you do not have a user account, please register for the Hanser Customer Center.

» Do you already have a user account? Please log in here.
» Don't have a user account yet? Please register here.
Your wish lists
If you want to use your wish list during your next visit, simply log in. If you do not have a user account, please register for the Hanser Customer Center.
» Do you already have a user account? Please log in here.
» Don't have a user account yet? Please register here.

« Back

Your advantages at a glance

  • One login for all Hanser portals
  • Individual home page for faster access to preferred content
  • Exclusive access to selected content
  • Personal wish lists on all portals
  • Central management of your personal information and newsletter subscriptions

Register now
Deutsch
Bookmark Bookmarked
04-09-2013

Solid-Borne Sound Sensor Detects Mold Wear

When a problem exists in the mold (upper image) the frequency recording differs significantly from the frequency recording during normal operation (lower image). In this way, it is possible to recognize when the mold needs maintenance.

When a problem exists in the mold (upper image) the frequency recording differs significantly from the frequency recording during normal operation (lower image). In this way, it is possible to recognize when the mold needs maintenance.

In injection molds moving parts such as injectors, slides or guide systems above all are subject to considerable wear. For this reason, molds undergo maintenance at regular intervals during production. Fixed maintenance cycles, however, do not take actual mold wear into consideration: short intervals between maintenance interrupt production too often – but if the intervals are too long, there is a risk of producing bad parts.

A newly developed inspection method for injection molds based on the use of solid-borne sound sensors now makes maintenance based on the actual mold condition possible. The solid borne sound sensor measures the sound waves generated in the mold during production. Frequency images for the mold are first recorded when the mold is in perfect condition. As soon as the mold is put into production, a new frequency image is recorded at regular intervals and compared with the mold’s original acoustic "fingerprint". In this way, wear can also be detected while production is running, since the sensor can be attached to the mold at any time for a more or less random analysis. Moreover, it is also possible to attach the sensor to the mold permanently in order to monitor production fully automatically. As soon as a specified limit is exceeded, a warning signal is issued by the system or production is stopped.

Additional applications for the solid-borne sound sensor include detecting breakage of mold cores or determining the optimal balance between cycle time reduction and mold wear. In the future, it may also be possible to detect wear mechanisms on screws in injection molding machines and extruders by means of solid-borne sound sensors.

Dr.-Ing. Harald Sambale
sambale <AT> kunststoffe.de

contact
BW engineering GmbH
Eppenhauser Strasse 155
DE 58093 Hagen
Tel: +49 2331 34163 -0
Fax: +49 2331 34163 -63
info <AT> bwengineering.de


Newsletter

Would you like to subscribe to our Newsletters on plastics technology and profit from the latest information?

Subscribe here

Subscribe here