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Interfacial-surface-energy processes and residual stresses in glass fiber reinforced plastics

The formation of the interface between inorganic and organic fiber reactive resin essentially determined in addition to the fiber orientation and its content, the material properties of FRP. While the fibers are present as a finished semi-finished products, the resin must first wet it in the initial state and then harden and give a chemically resistant material. This hardening is associated with shrinkage, on the one hand, from the chemical shrinkage during polymerization, on the other hand, due to temperature differences between the reaction and the final state. The shrinkage makes the one hand an undulation by building a wave formation, on the other hand, by shrinking round the fiber. In both cases there are residual stresses, which are superimposed on subsequent external load stresses. These stresses are determined by model experiments and polarized light. The glass fibers themselves also have internal stresses, which can be visualized by solving acids.

The wetting behavior is determined by the surface tension of the glass fiber and resin. Primer and finish can have a decisive influence. Since both components are very brittle materials with low plastic deformation as the adhesion characteristics can be approximately determined from the characteristic specific values of surface tension.

Lesen Sie die deutsche Zusammenfassung auf Kunststoffe.de
Author
 Gottfried Ehrenstein

Gottfried Ehrenstein
Fakultät für Maschinenwesen
Hochschule Hannover

Information

Free keywords: Surface tension of UP and EP resins, wetting, residual stress, shrinkage, glass fibers, adhesion, curing, undulation
Institute / chair: Fakultät für Maschinenwesen der Technischen Hochschule Hannover
Language: German
Technical consultant for expert services: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Alexander Matting (Betreuer), Priv.-Doz. Dr.-Ing. Heinz Haferkamp
Publication year: 1967
Provider: Wissenschaftlicher Arbeitskreis Kunststofftechnik (WAK) / Kunststoffe.de

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