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10-17-2017

Sustainability in Colors

Karl Finke

Product samples provide an overview of the ways to dye sustainable plastics (© Finke)

A number of materials have meanwhile become established, which are made on the basis of renewable resources, either entirely, or in part. Some of these materials are biodegradable. Masterbatches and dyes are now following suit. Establishing the formulations of additives, the particular properties and the behaviors of bioplastics during processing must be considered. What is more, the formulations have to meet specific requirements. This is because, in line with their application, the individual components should consist of renewable resources, too. They should also be biodegradable, if this is part of the product specification.

Karl Finke GmbH & Co. KG in Wuppertal, Germany, developed their Fibaplast masterbatch series designed to precisely adapt the dye to the bioplastic to be colored. Interested parties can see these masterbatches at Fakuma, in the form of a Susbox (Sus meaning sustainability) that contains product samples from practical application. The box includes 14 injection molded badges made of polylactid acid (PLA), polybutylene succinate (PBS), wood plastics compounds (WPC), thermoplastic starch polymer blends (TPS), Bio-PE, Bio-PP and Bio-PET. The color samples are dyed with the newly developed bio-masterbatches. The manufacturer says that the formulations meet all requirements for compostability according to EN 13432, which means each individual raw material, such as pigments, dyes, fillers and additives were evaluated, tested and approved for application. With each polymer comes an undyed badge, so that the user can evaluate the impact the dye has on product properties.

In addition to the injection molded badges, the user also finds an extruded film sample out of a home compostable PLA among the samples. Four blow-molded bottles produced out of bio-polymers and recyclates at Finke technical center show that various special effects are possible with these materials. The box also contains explanations of important terms, properties and generation of common bio-polymers, as well as information on the market situation and certification.

Fakuma 2017: Hall A4, booth 4208

Company profile

Karl Finke GmbH & Co. KG

Hatzfelder Str. 174-176
DE 42281 Wuppertal
Tel.: 0202 709060
Fax: 0202 703929

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